Welcome to National Secondhand Day: my top five picks

 

secondhand

Today is the fourth national Secondhand Day, as organised by the Preloved website. It is a way to celebrate and promote all things secondhand.

Now I don’t need any encouragement to buy secondhand as most of my wardrobe is sourced from charity shops, jumble sales, vintage boutiques and clothes swaps.  But there are other items that I love to source secondhand. Buying secondhand is cheap, recycled, unique and (often) a way of giving to good causes.

Here are my top five non-clothing secondhand picks:

  1.  Books

secondhand Persephone books

One of my favourite things to do is to spend time in a secondhand bookshop: surely one of the greatest joys in life is to browse their shelves. I love the Persephone books but they are expensive firsthand and a rarity to find secondhand. The two editions above, though, were picked up from charity shops.

2) Games

board games at Christmas

As a family we have picked up many boardgames secondhand. Some will stay with us for a long time while others are re-donated, as the children grow out of them.

3) Vinyl

NOW That's What I Call Music

While we have quite a few albums from our teenage years, the purchase of a new record player a couple of years ago, has led to my husband and I searching for secondhand vinyl. We’re quite pleased with our growing collection of Now That’s What I call Music albums, bought for a few pounds each from charity shops.

3) Furniture

second-hand furnishings in cottage sitting room

We practically furnished our lounge with second-hand furniture last winter. The chair was picked up for free from the street. The lamp and keyboard came from the local Dorothy House Furniture and Electrical Appliance store and the shelves were upcycled from old floorboards (also not shown is our secondhand sofa, picked up for £35)

4) Appliances

secondhand breadmaker

We have picked up breadmakers, hoover, toaster, kettle and now an ice cream maker from specialist charity shops that sell furniture and electrical appliances. All the appliances are PAT tested and are so well priced I would never buy firsthand again.

5) Jewellery

secondhand necklace

Not strictly clothing so I’m going to include this. I have picked up rings and necklaces secondhand and have never regretted any purchase. I seem to wear this necklace nearly every day as it goes with everything: not bad for a couple of quid from a charity shop.

If you’ve never tried second-hand before I would really urge you to give it a go. If preloved clothing isn’t for you then skip the garments and go straight for the bric-a-brac or books section. I can assure you that rummaging through charity shops and bagging yourself a bargain is sheer joy!

If you are interested in secondhand clothing I recently wrote about why I’m still charity shopping in my 40s for The Thrift blog here.

(If you like this post please follow me on facebook , twitter or instagram)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second-hand Vinyl Find: Now That’s What I Call Music 3 (plus a wish list)

Now That's What I Call Music Vol 3

Another great vinyl find last weekend. While we have not been intentionally searching for second-hand copies of Now That’s What I Call Music, my husband and I have stumbled across a few that are just too good to miss. On Saturday we bought Volume 3 from the Oxfam shop in Chippenham, for just £1.99.

This album really reflects the music I was into in my early teens and even includes one of the first records I ever bought: The Reflex by Duran Duran. Just one look at the cover and I’m transported back to my bedroom in 1984 with posters of Duran Duran and Nik Kershaw on the walls.

The lineup on the double album is really quite impressive and a snapshot of what I was listening to in 1984 (although not, I hasten to mention, Gary Glitter, who makes an appearance on this album before he is airbrushed out of 1980s pop).

NOW Vol 3

My tastes did become a little more Indie as the decade wore on, which probably explains why I’m not that interested in later versions.

However this Volume 3 can now be added to Volume 9 (see here) and our special Now One, which has a completely different look to it here

NOW That's What I Call MusicThis year I have a sort of wish list when hunting for second-hand vinyl, although as records become more popular (even Sainsburys is selling vinyl), the prices are starting to rise in second-hand shops. My shopping list is:

  • Rumours by Fleetwood Mac (I suspect this is getting harder to pick up second-hand, but what a great album and one of the few where every track is brilliant and poignant)
  • Tapestry by Carole King (as above, a hard one to source second-hand)
  • Spandau Ballet: Journeys to Glory (their first album when the band were still part of the Blitz Club scene)
  • The Beatles’ albums: Sergeant Pepper, The White Album, Abbey Road (yes this is quite a long shot. I am fortunate that I have inherited a lot of my parents’ Beatles albums and only need these three to complete the collection. But probably more of a dream list now…)

Saturday 16 April is Record Store Day and a great opportunity to discover vinyl. See the website here for events that are happening near to you.

 

Second-hand vinyl: a Number One find!

I’m so excited! We recently picked up this first volume of ‘Now That’s What I call Music’ from 1983. The double album looks very different to the latest incarnations here

It seems that 90 albums ago the design was like this:

NOW Vol One

Of course, it doesn’t say Volume One on the cover – perhaps they only imagined it as a one off? There are also no images of pigs with sunglasses which I swear was once the logo for this series.

The double album was in great condition and there are some real gems. It appears that 1983 was a great year for music: Culture Club’s Karma Chameleon, Duran Duran’s Is There Something I Should Know?, Human League’s (Keep Feeling) Fascination, The Cure’s Love Cats – and two of my personal favourites: Heaven 17’s Temptation (which is played every year at our 80s party and gets everyone on the dancefloor) and Simple Minds’ Waterfront.

We picked the album up for £3.99 at our local Oxfam store but I’ve seen it for sale for £20 on e-bay – not that I would part with this piece of 80s history!