Second-hand Hygge.

Second hand Hygge via ssecondhandtales.wordpress.com

Have you come across ‘Hygge’ this winter? It’s the latest concept to come out of Denmark and, loosely translated, means a sense of feeling cosy at the darkest time of the year. As today is the shortest day of the year I thought I would share the post I wrote for Barnardo’s The Thrift website on how to do Hygge on a budget. You can read about it here: https://the-thrift.co.uk/2016/11/29/hygge-the-thrifty-way/

 

 

My post from The Thrift: Why I’m still charity shopping in my forties

Last month I wrote a post for the wonderful The-Thrift blog, which promotes shopping at Barnardo’s charity shops.

I wrote about why I’m in my mid-forties and still sourcing my wardrobe from charity shops and other second-hand sources. Here is a (slightly) updated version:

As someone in their mid 40s you would have thought that charity shopping is something I’d grown out of by now. But I guess I have been second-hand shopping for so many decades that my brain is now hardwired to head straight for the thrift stores.  I also love the thrill of a bargain, the individuality of charity shop purchases and the feeling I get from giving to a good cause, such as Barnardo’s. And there’s other reasons as well:

1) It’s something I haven’t grown out of. I first started second-hand shopping in my early teens when charity stores circa 1985 were very different to the ones you see now. Ironically, although these places were frowned upon they were stocked with amazing pieces from the ’50s and ’60s that would now be classed as vintage.

Charity Shop find from early 1990s.

Charity Shop find from early 1990s.

2) It’s my own personal style and no one will have the same outfit as me. I have to confess this was the reason I began charity shopping many years ago. As a student I wanted to look individual. I wanted to wear the shirt, jacket or shorts that no one else had. I guess this is a habit that has stuck with me.

3) It’s cheap. As a teenager of the 1980s I imagined my future self to be some highly driven career woman buying all my clothes from designer shops  – or M&S at least. When I worked full time in my twenties I did buy my work clothes from High Street stores. However since having children and taking on a range of part time and freelance work, I have less of a budget, or indeed a need, for buying first hand workwear. As a result I can stock my casual wardrobe with low price second-hand clothes.

4) It encourages re-use, and donating to good causes. Long before we knew about the three Rs charity shops were there to enable us to buy re-used clothing. I truly believe that by purchasing second-hand we are extending the life of a garment. We are ensuring the resources that are used to make, transport and package it are stretched for just a little longer.  Our hard earned cash is also going back into the charity pot, rather than into the hands of an anonymous corporation.  But in order to keep the cycle going we must remember to donate our unwanted clothing to charity shops too.

donating to charity shops

 

5) ) I’m a ‘bargain hunter’ . This comes down to the fact that I love browsing and getting a good bargain! Last month I bought a brilliant denim shirt dress for a fiver from the British Heart Foundation shop. I’d been coveting a similar one from Fat Face for £45!

£5 denim dress

While I never believe you should dress ‘age appropriate’ there are a few charity shop outfits that I no longer aspire to wear. Browsing through all the great posts from other (younger) The Thrift bloggers I know there are dress lengths and styles that I no longer feel comfortable wearing. However the nineteen year old who used to wear a pair of shorts made from old curtains is still there – she just has to turn the curtains into a below the knee dress now…

(If you like this post please follow me on facebook , twitter or instagram)

My guest post for The Thrift: Why I’m still charity shopping in my forties

the thrift guest post

Last month I was asked to write a guest post for The Thrift. This is a blog run by the Barnardos UK charity, promoting their chain of more than 640 shops throughout the country. Barnardos is a well-established charity that cares for vulnerable children (when I was at school I remember being given a Barnardo’s money box to save donations in).

My guest post for The Thrift can be found here. It’s all about why I still find myself charity shopping in my forties (maybe I haven’t grown up yet!)

(If you like this post please follow me on facebook , twitter or instagram)

 

Welcome to National Secondhand Day: my top five picks

 

secondhand

Today is the fourth national Secondhand Day, as organised by the Preloved website. It is a way to celebrate and promote all things secondhand.

Now I don’t need any encouragement to buy secondhand as most of my wardrobe is sourced from charity shops, jumble sales, vintage boutiques and clothes swaps.  But there are other items that I love to source secondhand. Buying secondhand is cheap, recycled, unique and (often) a way of giving to good causes.

Here are my top five non-clothing secondhand picks:

  1.  Books

secondhand Persephone books

One of my favourite things to do is to spend time in a secondhand bookshop: surely one of the greatest joys in life is to browse their shelves. I love the Persephone books but they are expensive firsthand and a rarity to find secondhand. The two editions above, though, were picked up from charity shops.

2) Games

board games at Christmas

As a family we have picked up many boardgames secondhand. Some will stay with us for a long time while others are re-donated, as the children grow out of them.

3) Vinyl

NOW That's What I Call Music

While we have quite a few albums from our teenage years, the purchase of a new record player a couple of years ago, has led to my husband and I searching for secondhand vinyl. We’re quite pleased with our growing collection of Now That’s What I call Music albums, bought for a few pounds each from charity shops.

3) Furniture

second-hand furnishings in cottage sitting room

We practically furnished our lounge with second-hand furniture last winter. The chair was picked up for free from the street. The lamp and keyboard came from the local Dorothy House Furniture and Electrical Appliance store and the shelves were upcycled from old floorboards (also not shown is our secondhand sofa, picked up for £35)

4) Appliances

secondhand breadmaker

We have picked up breadmakers, hoover, toaster, kettle and now an ice cream maker from specialist charity shops that sell furniture and electrical appliances. All the appliances are PAT tested and are so well priced I would never buy firsthand again.

5) Jewellery

secondhand necklace

Not strictly clothing so I’m going to include this. I have picked up rings and necklaces secondhand and have never regretted any purchase. I seem to wear this necklace nearly every day as it goes with everything: not bad for a couple of quid from a charity shop.

If you’ve never tried second-hand before I would really urge you to give it a go. If preloved clothing isn’t for you then skip the garments and go straight for the bric-a-brac or books section. I can assure you that rummaging through charity shops and bagging yourself a bargain is sheer joy!

If you are interested in secondhand clothing I recently wrote about why I’m still charity shopping in my 40s for The Thrift blog here.

(If you like this post please follow me on facebook , twitter or instagram)